Teaching Kids the Value of Hard Work & Finding Their Passion

jobs for kids

As you know from our love for all things entrepreneurial, we’re always keen on finding tasks or jobs for kids to do.  Even though our kids are young, we want them to grow up to be hard working, determined, creative, self-sufficient, happy individuals.  

Of course, working hard is a lot easier to do if you find that thing you love to do – and do that.  But how in the heck do we as parents help them find the things they’re passionate about?  

EXPOSURE.

Get to Work

Our good friend bought a house recently and since he’s taking pruning to a whole new level we thought we’d jump in there and let him teach us a thing or two about tree trimming.  We love when our friends or family have skills outside of our wheelhouse so they can fill in the gaps so to speak.

teaching kids work ethic jobs for kids Judah is so cute with this machete.  He just wants to let the branches have it.  I love how determined he is when he sets his mind to something.  In this case, it didn’t matter how long it was going to take him to chop that branch.  It was happening.  He was trash talking it too!

Jobs for Kids?  Isn’t there Some Law Against Child Labor?

If you want to boost your kids’ self-image and give them a sense of pride and purpose, PUT THEM TO WORK!  There is something so gratifying about working with your hands and seeing real progress come from hard work.  I’m not talking cracking the whip and stealing away their play time here – I’m saying that putting them in environments where they can produce something tangible with their own hands does something for the soul.

Maybe it’s a bit of a leap to see this little tree trimming exercise as something that’s going to propel them into a successful future.  But that’s just the thing.  We don’t know what “the thing” will be for each of them, so we try all kinds of things and eventually someTHING will stick.  In the meantime, they become a little more well-rounded and gather skills they can use down the line.

If nothing else, their spouses will think they are super hot when they are out there landscaping their own yards in a couple decades!

bonfire Roasting hot dogs and marshmallows over the fire was a great way to end a hard days work for the kids.  A sweet reward after flexing some serious muscle.  They are growing up too fast!

So next time you’re pruning the bushes, slow down, take the extra time to show them proper technique, and explain how cutting certain branches makes the whole tree healthier.   Then give them the shears and see what happens.

Share your knowledge with them and remember that baby steps are the most exciting ones.

Who knows, maybe they’ll start their own business, landscaping, in junior high school and be one step closer to understanding what it takes to run a profitable company.

Until then, join me in looking for every opportunity to expose our kids to the expertise of those right in front of us – our family and friends.  It’s easy, fun, and super beneficial.  And if you haven’t read it yet, check out our top 15 business ideas for kids to get your kids thinking about ways they can be junior entrepreneurs RIGHT NOW!

Emily Eck Home Sweet Road

About Emily Oak

I am a Mother, a Lover, a Traveler, Entrepreneur and Blogger. I crave adventure, appreciate good leather, find old weathered wood beautiful, prefer french pressed coffee, and feel alive running in the rain (albeit at a snails pace)! I believe in living passionately, loving extravagantly, taking risks, forgiving often, and living for the audience of One. I am an introvert but you wouldn’t know that if you met me. I LOVE people.

Comments

  1. Jenni Dee says:

    I like your ideas about being more aware of the activities going on around us so that we can make the most of each and every learning opportunity for our kids.

    • All you have to do is ask the rangers or those stationed at the front desk of the visitors centers. They are usually quite warm and kind to the kids.

  2. Just read your post about starting the kids out early on getting a business or two under their belt while they are young. I like this idea as well. Exposing them to the expertise of as many people in their lives as possible is a great idea, and doesn’t seem like it would take that much extra work.

    • It really isn’t that much extra effort. It just requires being more intentional. Slowing down a bit and taking the time to ask questions, and let them try things. Having kids interact with friends and family on a different level introduces a really cool dynamic to the relationship as well.

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